vietnam
inthenews
intergovernmental asia-pacific consultations 
on refugees, displaced persons and migrants

     

 

     

    

:  home :  about us :  apc contacts in the news :  apc-government access : 

Stories

Vietnam elects new president (27 June 2006)

Former British singer to appear at Vietnam's appeal court (8 June 2006)

International agencies acknowledge Vietnam's nutrition drive (7 June 2006)


Vietnam elects new president (27 June 2006)

Vietnamese legislators on Tuesday elected Communist Party chief for Ho Chi Minh City, Nguyen Minh Triet, as the country's new president in a continuing leadership shuffle.

 
Triet, 63, an economic reformer and the sole candidate for the job, won overwhelming backing from the National Assembly with 94 percent of the vote.
 
"This is an honor, but also a heavy responsibility the party and people assigned to me," Triet said in his acceptance speech. "I swear to try my best to serve the country, serve the people and fulfill the job of president."
 
Triet, in turn, nominated Deputy Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung, 56, to become the next prime minister.
 
Over the weekend, the lawmaking body cleared the way for the new leaders after approving the resignation of Prime Minister Phan Van Khai, 72, President Tran Duc Luong, 69, and National Assembly Chairman Nguyen Van An, 69.
 
On Monday, the assembly elected Nguyen Phu Trong, 62, Communist Party chief for Hanoi, as the new chairman of the legislature.
 
Vietnam is a one-party state with a collective style of leadership. The prime minister is in charge of overseeing the government's day-to-day workings, while the president holds a more ceremonial position. The country's most powerful leader is the head of the Communist Party.
 
Triet, from the southern province of Binh Duong, spent most of his time during the Vietnam War promoting communist ideals to young people. He was appointed party chief of southern Song Be province in 1992 and guided the largely agricultural province into one of most attractive places for foreign investors.
 
On Tuesday he praised the country's successes, but said much work remained.
 
"Over the past years, the renewal process was initiated and our party has recorded great achievements," he said. "However, there are a lot of difficulties and challenges lying ahead of us."
 
Triet was elected to the all-powerful Politburo in 1997 and became head of the Communist Party in Vietnam's southern economic hub, Ho Chi Minh City, in 2000.
 
A year later, he was at the helm when underworld kingpin Truong Van Cam, known as Nam Cam, was arrested.
 
Nam Cam was the star of the communist country's biggest-ever criminal trial in 2003. The proceedings involved 155 defendants, including police officers and high-ranking government officials. Nam Cam was convicted of murder and bribery and was executed by firing squad along with four of his associates.
 
The National Assembly was expected to vote on the new prime minister later Tuesday.
 
The legislators also are expected to approve the appointments of six other positions, including the ministers of defense, foreign affairs and transport, before wrapping up its six-week session on Thursday. International Herald Tribune
 

Former British singer to appear at Vietnam's appeal court (8 June 2006)

Gary Glitter, an ex-rocker from Britain, who received a three-year imprisonment sentence for the charge of molesting two Vietnamese children in 2005, are scheduled to appear at the Vietnamese court of appeal on June 15.

"The court of appeal regarding the case of Gary Glitter is scheduled to take place on June 15 in Ho Chi Minh City (southern Vietnam)," Le Dung, spokesman of the Vietnamese Ministry of Foreign Affairs,  told reporters here Thursday.

On March 3, the People's Court of southern Ba Ria Vung Tau province passed the verdict on the 62-year-old former singer, whose real name is Paul Gadd, saying he molested two local girls, born in 1994 and 1993, in early 2005.

Glitter, detained by Vietnamese police last November when trying to board a flight for Thailand, had two local sex partners who brought the two girls, a niece of a partner and a friend of another partner, to a villa in the province's Vung Tau beach city rented by him.

During the two children's visits to the villa, Glitter molested them, the court of first instance said.

Glitter came to Vung Tau in December 2004, then left the city, and came back in March 2005. He was sentenced to four months' imprisonment in Britain in 1999 for possession of around 4,000 images of child pornography.

The age of consent in Vietnam is 16. According to the country's criminal law, sex with a minor is punishable by up to 15 years in prison, and raping a minor can be punished by death. Source: Xinhua

Return to Top of Page       Back to Home Page  


International agencies acknowledge Vietnam's nutrition drive (7 June 2006)

Vietnam is the only developing country coming close to the target of reducing its child malnutrition rate to less than 15% by 2015, said officials from the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Education Fund (UNICEF).

The target was set by a WHO and UNICEF joint project on fighting undernourishment in children in developing countries. 

Compared with other Southeast Asian countries, Vietnam's malnutrition rate is lower than that of Cambodia and Laos, but higher than that of the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand and Singapore, said Director of the Health Ministry's Nutrition Institute Nguyen Cong Khan. 

However, Khan added that the country's undernourishment rate among children remains high, particularly in northern mountainous areas, the Central Highlands and Northern Central Vietnam. The malnutrition reduction drive has moved slowly and unsustainably in the southern central and Mekong River Delta provinces due to natural disasters.

According to the Nutrition Institute, more than 1.8 million children nationwide are underweight, over 2.1 million children are shorter than average, and 337,000 suffer from serious malnutrition.

The Institute's director proposed that higher priority be given to mountainous and disadvantaged areas to help increase the proportion of micronutrients in children's diets in these localities.

In addition, he stressed that more informational campaigns should be held to raise people's awareness about the need to improve nutrition quality for children, particularly those aged from six months to three years.

The Nutrition Institution is conducting research on adding micronutrients to certain kinds of foods such as fish sauce, sugar, flour and biscuits. (VNA)


Return to Top of Page       Back to Home Page  




 

 

:  home :  about us :  apc contacts in the news :  apc-government access : 

� 2004 APC Process.  Last updated Tuesday, June 27, 2006